Public lecture: Antimicrobial resistance: why should you care if antibiotics stop working?

When and where

2 October 2017
11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4LE

Public lecture: Antimicrobial resistance: why should you care if antibiotics stop working?

In this lecture Dr Susan Hopkins will cover the reliance we have on antibiotics and how this regular usage as treatment has led to antibiotic resistance, which ultimately will change healthcare in the future.

6pm          Arrival and refreshments
6.30pm     Lecture
7.30pm     Lecture finishes

Antimicrobial resistance is a threat to each and every person in the world. It is estimated that, by 2050, 10 million lives a year are at risk.

Microbes have always mutated and evaded the drugs that can be used to destroy them. With the regular use of antibiotics in the 1950s:

  • deaths from pneumonia and skin infections declined dramatically
  • the risk of infection related to surgery and childbirth reduced
  • chemotherapy for cancer became possible.

We rely on antibiotics: one in three of us takes them at least once per year and one in three hospital inpatients are on antibiotics on any given day. However, no new antibacterial class has been developed for 30 years.

We face a future where we cannot deliver healthcare as we know it. This talk will outline the personal and collective actions we need to take to prevent this happening.

Dr Susan Hopkins

  • consultant in infectious diseases and microbiology, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust (and Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital)
  • healthcare epidemiologist, Public Health England
  • honorary senior lecturer, University College London.

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