Future Hospital development site - Phase 2: Central and south Manchester

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Spanning central and south Manchester, this Future Hospital project team are creating and implementing a new model of ‘joined-up’ care for respiratory patients.

The central and south Manchester team describe the context of their work, the importance of patient involvement and their ambitions for the future.

A single respiratory care service in Manchester

The central and south Manchester team aims to:

  • create a single respiratory integrated care service
  • enhance patient experience and reduce fragmentation in care
  • gain greater efficiency and value from resources
  • reduce healthcare inequality across central and south Manchester.

‘Joined-up’, or integrated care, is that which unites different arms of health and social care services. Across the region, the central and south Manchester project team want to support people across the whole health and care system, from diagnosis, disease management to palliative care. The team hopes to guarantee seamless transitions across the whole care pathway for their patients: making a key recommendation of the Future Hospital Commission report a reality.

Across the region, the central and south Manchester project team want to support people across the whole health and care system, from diagnosis, disease management to palliative care.

Patient involvement

Patients are instrumental to the day-to-day running of all development site projects. In her blog for the Future Hospital Partners Network, Francesca Creighton Griffiths, member of the RCP's Patient and Carer Network and patient representative for the central and south Manchester respiratory project, outlines how their multiprofessional group are involving patients in their ambitious, complex work.

2016 highlights

  • Dr Binita Kane, respiratory physician and clinical lead for the project, won the NHS North West Leadership Recognition Award in the emerging leader category in December 2016. The award recognises the great leadership that Binita provides, both in dealing with others and in improving health and social care in the region.
  • In 2016, Manchester became the first local authority to take control of its health and social care budget under new ‘DevoManc’ legislation. The central and south Manchester respiratory project is happening in the context of a planned merger between two main trusts in the city: Central Manchester University Hospital Foundation Trust and University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust. As integration of services is a key aim for the project, the team are playing a proactive role in determining how services will look in the future.